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Visualising Customer Success with SketchUp, the Archilime way.

Customer relationships are important to us and we’re delighted that our good friends Archilime Visualisation have agreed to share some insight into their work and processes, while also offering a few nice words about their favourite reseller!

Cadsoft Solutions Limited was founded over 15 years ago. From the very beginning it has always been about adding value for our customers and partners. We pride ourselves on extensive product knowledge and the provision of first class technical support, assisting all customers to solve problems in a timely and helpful manner, and to find the right solutions for their business. We recognise that buying software is an investment and getting the right solution for that investment is paramount. That’s why we value the relationships with all our customers, offering them insight and an honest appraisal based on customers’ needs and requirements. Over to you, Jack!

Please introduce yourself and your team. 

I am Jack Dicker, founder of Archilime Visualisation based on the outskirts of beautiful Dartmoor in Devon! I have an extremely talented team of seven that deliver high-quality digital media content primarily focused around the creation of CGI and Animation for marketing and planning purposes, along with the launch of the Archilime Academy in March 2019 providing bespoke SketchUp & Vray NEXT training in the South West. Our team of in-house creatives specialise in high-end bespoke Interior & Exterior CGI, VR, Fly-through & Fly-over Animation, Drone photography, 3D Design Development, interactive plot selector web-apps and property marketing brochures for a range of clients, internationally. – The complete marketing package for any property development

Why use SketchUp? What is it about this application that you like? 

This is something we are asked a lot of the time from people we meet at networking events and business lunches because everyone assumes we use 3DS MAX or C4D. When we say we use solely SketchUp, they look at us shocked. SketchUp is hugely underrated, the truth is it can do just as good a job if not better. This month alone we managed to successfully issue out 52 still images to clients, all created in SketchUp and rendered on V-Ray. 

I may run the risk of echoing what we say through our Archilime Academy marketing but SketchUp is the fastest modelling tool out there from our point of view and for visualisation it’s the key for efficiency. The modelling/rendering phase is probably about 90% of our workflow and the last 10% is Photoshop so the rumour that SketchUp cannot handle big files is just not right. When optimised correctly, SketchUp is the simplest way to demonstrate project development and it allows us to discuss, sketch and elaborate on live project design when in any 3D Design Development meeting. I think I would struggle to do something so seamless in more advanced software like 3DS MAX. Personally, our business model relies heavily on the construction of the scene before post production so we have the ability to secure further profit opportunities with any additional imagery added to an order. To be able to do this we create everything in the model space and then render it directly in V-Ray from SketchUp. 

Along with SketchUp, you use Laubwerk and V-Ray? What’s the stand out functionality of these applications? 

We have a gigantic list of plugins we use for different projects whether master planning, residential, interior or exterior and aerial but our five most used plugins right now? These are V-Ray, Laubwerk, Skatter, Thru Paint and Soap Skin. Something that is also huge for us is Profile Builder and whilst not everyone uses it, it’s prominence and use will be integral to our process in 2020. 

Laubwerk has been a game changer for us in the past two years. I was heavily involved in the BETA testing with a few other artists around the world to try and get this into the public eye and iron out the creases! Through this stage we tested models, transparency, proxy delivery and general render times for most species on the first pack. I must say, for anyone using SketchUp, Laubwerk is a must have plugin. We would not be able to do case studies as quick without Laubwerk. Yes, we have libraries full of planting from companies like Vizpark, Xfrog, Evermotion etc but Laubwerk is a pre-constructed model library built into SketchUp so there is no messing around with OBJ files or re-texturing materials. Rumour has it that they are also developing some other incredible features too which will only strengthen what they already offer for SketchUp.

Generally speaking, each project requires a plan of attack and could feature an array of software and external plugin requirements along the way but we import CAD into SketchUp, mass (model) the proposal, add detailing, hardscaping, landscaping and then start testing materiality within V-Ray. 

Can you share a project you’re most proud of?

This is the ongoing discussion we have every year and I’m sure the team have their own favourites. I’ve asked the room and it’s all different and I guess that’s because certain artists worked on certain jobs, but mine has probably got to be Maris Meadow.

Working closely with your reseller…..

The excellent relationship Archilime has with Cadsoft, particularly Nick Johnson, is important. Cadsoft Solutions always surpasses what has been expected of a reseller. I always receive honest advice from Cadsoft, along with time to help resolve technical issues with swarm rendering, node setups, licensing over our PCs and news on what’s happening for the future which is massively important because we can then make strategic decisions in advance. We are comfortable and confident about calling to discuss issues too. If something cannot be diagnosed there and then, I know full well it will be looked into and get a call back.

Thank you, Jack! Archilime Visualisation and Cadsoft Solutions Limited have worked closely now for many years. We value their business and greatly admire the ambition, creativity and talent of this industrious organisation. We look forward to serving Archilime’s software needs for many years to come.

If you would like to be featured as a customer case study, contact John Quinn in our Marketing team.

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Showcase interior design projects with SketchUp

SketchUp Pro Subscription

In part 1 of this series, we revealed how to create winning interior design options in SketchUp. Now that you’re finished modelling, what’s next? 
We show you how to present your vision to customers and blow them away with your designs. And don’t forget to sign up to watch a live demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar.

A SketchUp Pro subscription includes a powerful ecosystem of products to help you communicate your creations. Let’s explore!

Add custom Styles to your design

Adding your personal style is an important part of showcasing designs. StyleBuilder allows you to create customised line styles using imported digital or hand drawn strokes. Think crisp pen lines, wavy pencil marks or marks from a fat stick of graphite. Combine line styles with unique textures, colours and watermarks to inject your creative flair into models, renders and animations. 

In SketchUp, you can create and edit styles. Apply your preferred style settings with a single click.

Create stunning 2D drawings and branded presentation documents

Now that you’ve added a style, it’s time to insert the model into LayOut. When you import a 3D model, a viewport is placed on the page. Good news, the scenes you set up in your SketchUp file are ready to use in LayOut. 

Combine model views with text and 2D vector illustration to present design details, materials and design options. Many of the tools in LayOut work as they do in SketchUp. That means you can quickly get to drawing, resizing, adding details, making copies and changing styles and scale. 

Present your project in LayOut

Present your ideas with SketchUp Viewer 

Are printed drawings or a pdf the only way to showcase your work? Of course not! SketchUp Viewer for Mobile gives you the power to view and share your portfolio on iOS and Android devices. Take advantage of Augmented Reality to evaluate design options in real-world scale. Switch between scenes to showcase designs on the go while retaining your model’s style.

Model on the go with SketchUp for Web

Not all CAD tools are fully editable on the web, SketchUp is! Handy if you need to make on-the-fly changes when you’re away from your desktop computer. Let’s say you’re in a meeting at a client’s office and they want to see a project with a revised furniture layout. Open a model to SketchUp for Web directly from Trimble Connect on any web device to make the changes in real-time. Save the file to Trimble Connect for easy access back at the office. 

Create rendered images with Trimble Connect visualiser

We’ll wrap this up with something that we are very excited about. Rendering! With a SketchUp Pro Subscription, you can create simplified renders using Trimble Connect for Desktop and the brand new Trimble Connect Visualiser. Note: this feature is currently available for Windows only. 

Step into AR/VR to experience designs before they’re built

Do you have access to a VR or Mixed Reality device? If your answer is yes, you can bring 3D models to life in mixed or virtual reality. Step into a powerful new way to explore, understand, and share your work. The best part? It’s part of a SketchUp Pro Subscription.

Are you using a SketchUp Pro Perpetual license that has expired or is soon to expire? Want to get on to subscription and take advantage of all the new additional features the new plan offers? Email us info@cadsoftsolutions.co.uk and we can advise you.

Remember to sign up to watch a step-by-step demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar on December 11th, 4pm UTC.

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How to win interior design projects with SketchUp

SketchUp Pro Subscription Workflow

Pitching for a new project is one of the most exciting parts of the design process. Creativity needs to flow but deadlines are around the corner. You want to get ideas out of your head quickly and turn them into winning results that will wow your client, boss or team. 

Leverage the full power of a SketchUp Pro subscription at every stage of your creative process to deliver impactful concepts, quickly. Watch us do it live by signing up for our upcoming webinar (and keep reading for a sneak peak!) 

In Part 1 of this series, we’ll teach you how to start from scratch and create design options with ease. In Part 2, you’ll learn how to showcase those designs in their best light, leaving your audience mesmerised. The examples used are interior design focused but don’t worry, these concepts can be applied to almost any industry!

Get started with a 2D sketch, floorplan or photo in SketchUp Pro

There are a few different ways to bring your project into SketchUp right from the start. Don’t be afraid to use what you have depending on the project, whether a sketch, photograph (check out how to use Match Photo) or a 2D plan:

  1. Working from a hand-drawn sketch? Import the hand drawing as an image and start tracing with the Line tool to create a floorplan. This is an easy (and thus popular) way to bring a floorplan into SketchUp.
  1. Have a set of plans? Import a floor plan in CAD, image or PDF. Draw the outline of your project by scaling and drawing from the plan as a reference.

Bring the outline into 3D 

Once you have an outline, you’re ready to draw exterior walls. This workflow highlights how to use imported CAD geometry as your starting point

Create multiple design options using 3D Warehouse

It’s time to bring your space to life. Apply colors and textures with materials to add detail and realism to your models. Visualize your design ideas fast by importing real products from 3D Warehouse

SketchUp lets you quickly work through configurations and build upon the ones you like. Show off options for furnishings or add in various types of greenery to brighten the space and give your design some personality.

The key to showcasing and organising design options for your projects in SketchUp is use of Layers and Scenes. Layers help you organise your model, and Scenes help you present designs easily by adjusting layers, objects, styles and more! 

Save your project to Trimble Connect 

Now that you have your design options in hand, it’s time to save your project to the cloud. Trimble Connect offers you unlimited cloud storage with full version control. The best part? It’s included in a SketchUp Pro subscription

Trimble Connect

Part of a design team? 

Working together just got a little easier with Trimble Connect. Let’s say you’re working on the interior design at the same time another team member is working on the MEP design. 

You can import a reference model into SketchUp from Trimble Connect. You won’t be able to modify the model, but you can use it as context to more easily coordinate the project. This is useful when you have a team of designers working on different areas. 

Invite other people to your project, create groups with different permissions to control which files members can access. You can also utilize version control to track project history and progress.

Flying solo? 

Each time you upload a copy of your design file, Trimble Connect will keep track of the versions. Use version control to manage different iterations of your model and share those as design options with your client. Assign to-dos and quickly work through client feedback, all within Trimble Connect.

Sign up to watch a step-by-step demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar on December 11th, 4pm UTC.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article to learn best practices for showcasing your design.

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V-Ray Next for SketchUp, update 1

Vray Next Cadsoft Solutions

Enhanced SketchUp integration. Faster interactive rendering. New, smart functionality.

V-Ray Next for SketchUp, update 1 features an improved user experience for some of your favourite V-Ray tools, faster interactive rendering and powerful new functionality to make it much easier to manage your scenes.

Deep SketchUp integration: Enjoy a natural, streamlined design workflow that leaves more room for creativity.

© Jose Carlos Vela Cáceres.

SKETCHUP COLOURISATION SUPPORT: V-Ray now fully supports native material colourisation.
Make colour corrections on standard SketchUp materials and see the effect right away in the V-Ray Frame Buffer.

IMPROVED USER EXPERIENCE: It’s easier and smoother to use your favourite V-Ray tools, including light creation, Infinite Plane and Scene Interaction. The tool cursor looks the same as SketchUp’s, and the SketchUp Instructor features detailed descriptions and animated presentations on how to use V-Ray tools.

Optimised performance: Faster renders across the board.

OPTIMISED INTERACTIVE RENDERING ON THE CPU: More responsive CPU interactive rendering when editing scene camera, lighting and materials.

NEW LIGHT CACHE ALGORITHM: The new default hash map Light Cache calculation mode resolves most common artifacts and is optimised and more stable when used in animations.

Streamlined workflows: Maximum creative control, minimum effort.

© SketchUp_DL_Projeto_de_Interiores-Quarto

CRYPTOMATTE ELEMENT: The Cryptomatte render element automatically generates and stores object- or material-based masks. It’s perfect when you need to accurately select objects in post-production.

QUICK DENOISER ENGINE SWITCH: A denoiser engine switch is now available in the main renderer rollout. Switch from V-Ray to NVIDIA AI denoising without the Denoiser advanced parameters panel.

UPDATED VFB LENS EFFECTS: Simulate real-world camera lens effects with new procedurally generated dust and scratches.

COLOUR PICKER TEMPERATURE: The V-Ray colour picker introduces a Kelvin temperature slider, which automatically provides a corresponding RGB colour allowing you to save and modify a temperature value for every colour slot.

V-Ray Next for SketchUp is available here.

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SketchUp Desktop 2019.3 Maintenance Release

SketchUp Pro Desktop 2019.3 maintenance update has been released. The SketchUp 2019.3 release focuses on bug fixes for the new macOS Catalina as well as an update to the sign in workflow due to upcoming changes with Google sign in.

Sign In Workflow Changes

What has changed?

Users will now sign into our desktop applications via an external web browser, instead of an embedded web browser. This change impacts both subscription and classic license users.

The change in 2019.3 that will impact classic license users: Users need to be signed in before accessing the 3D Warehouse, Extension Warehouse and Add Location, which they didn’t need to do in previous builds. Accessing these features will go through the new sign-in workflow, which means classic license users need Trimble IDs (or Google IDs) to access them.

Why? This past April, Google announced that it will no longer support Google Sign In through embedded browser frameworks. In order to continue supporting Google Sign In, we’re following one of Google’s recommended solutions: to have users sign in through their default web browsers and capture the sign in information via a web server on their local machine (127.0.0.1).

What does this mean from a user’s point of view?

  • All users need to be signed in to access the 3D Warehouse, Extension Warehouse, Trimble Connect and Add Location from within the desktop apps.
  • When a user selects a ‘Sign In’ command from within a desktop app, the user’s default web browser will open a new tab in order for them to sign in.

SketchUp Release Notes

Fixes

macOS Catalina Support

Added support for macOS Catalina, which included the following updates:

  • Implemented the notarization process that will be required for macOS Catalina.
  • Fixed an issue where the Welcome Window’s templates panel sometimes loaded slowly.
  • Fixed an issue where text was displayed with a black background on some configurations.

Other

  • Changed our internet connection tests to work more robustly across the globe.
  • (Win) Updated libcrypto and libssl dlls to 1.1.1c.

Please note: If you’re using either Microsoft Internet Explorer or Microsoft Edge as your default browser then you may run into some issues with this new workflow. You can read about this issue along with some workarounds in our article titled Support for Microsoft Internet Explorer or Edge Browser in SketchUp 2019.3 , please visit this article for more information.

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Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin

Cadsoft.Solutions.Modelur

Speaking earlier this year at our Kettle’s Yard event in Cambridge, Stephanie Veanca HoUniversity of Cambridge Department of Architecture delivered a fascinating presentation centred around the use of parametric urban design software tool, Modelur, developed to help you quickly create conceptual urban massing. Here, Stephanie has provided further insight into the department’s research and work with Sketchup and Modelur on the North East Cambridge Development.

Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin The research is undertaken by the Cities and Transport Group, Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, supervised by Dr Ying Jin. The Sketchup + Modelur model is made by Stephanie Veanca Ho and the UNITY environment and interface by Amir Soltani. In this project we define ‘built form’ as the assemblage of individual buildings and structures in the built environment and we make use of a wide range of new insights and data to model the evolution of the built form in Britain.  The project aims to produce graphic representation and visualisation using Sketchup 3D modelling and gaming software UNITY so that the complex built form options can be readily understood and explored by non-specialists.  This empowers citizens in their thinking of the future of the UK as well as the local communities, thus closing the feedback loop in analysis, modelling and decision-making for complex investment and development initiatives. 

This blog article focuses on the Sketchup and UNITY visualization example we have developed for North East Cambridge, an area by the Cambridge North Station. Our researchers explore ways to experiment the interrelationships between predictive Data (numbers), Site Strategy (urban scale) and Building Design (unit scale) that govern the outlook of neighbourhood developments. Sketchup plugin Modelur by AgiliCity is used to assist parametric modelling of city blocks and buildings for handling various data variables. For the use of this model’s predictive analyses, see the CPIER report  (https://www.cpier.org.uk/final-report/) and the first round of UK2070 Commission Reports (http://uk2070.org.uk/publications/).

Cambridge North East Development
The proposed development is located at the existing sewage plant north of the Cambridge North Station, bounded by the railway, Cowley Road and A14. It is also adjacent to the Cambridge Science Park and the St John’s Innovation Park. 
We need to figure out a way to get the total GFA per storey data and total unit number efficiently from the vast volumes of buildings created in Sketchup. We came across the plugin Modelur and Jernej Vidmar, Modelur’s creator, who has been very helpful assisting our research and experimental modelling since April.  

Building Type

4 types of building forms and 2 major land uses (housing and employment) are first identified. The respective and total GFA for each type of housing units and employment will have to match the different scenarios acquired earlier from data models. 

Sketchup &  Modelur

Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin

Modelur offers us a real-time data break-down report on screen while we change the size, height, combination of mixed land-uses and other town planning variables.  We can hence easily make changes to the urban design strategy and building types while maintaining data accuracy. Modelur also gives warnings to buildings that do not fall into the city block parameters or zoning prerequisites, such as maximum building height, FAR, minimum distances between buildings, etc.

From Sketchup to UNITY

In this project we define ‘built form’ as the assemblage of individual buildings and structures in the built environment and we make use of a wide range of new insights and data to model the evolution of the built form in Britain. The Sketchup model here focuses on the Cambridge North East site (the existing sewage plant near the Cambridge North Railway Station).

Further Research

Sketchup, Modelur and UNITY

Modelur is also capable of generating data reports and in the most recent version, of importing much more complex and layered GIS datasets. Modelur has proven very useful accompanying the 3D capacity of Sketchup for handling large-scale urban forms. The plugin has enhanced the output accuracy of the digitally-built environment which can then be taken on for further research.

SketchUp is available on our web store as a perpetual and annual subscription.

Modelur is available with personal and team annual subscription options.

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“Would You Like SketchUp With That?” returns Oct 9th!

Whether you’re interested in learning about new features and enhancements, tips and tricks from assembled experts and specialists or keen to see some of SketchUp’s most powerful and dynamic plug-ins in action, you need to come along to our next FREE SketchUp beer & pizza event! Last time out we were in Cambridge at the prestigious Kettle’s Yard. This time we’re at Anomalous Space, Pentonville Road, London.

Uniquely located between London’s Angel Islington, Kings Cross, Clerkenwell & Old Street, Anomalous Space is a multi-use environment situated within a converted Georgian town house. Boasting original Art Deco features and contemporary technology Anomalous Space seamlessly blends the comfort of the old with the innovation of the new. Angel tube station is only a 2 minute walk from the venue.

Paul Hensey, Principal of Green Zone Design Limited, will be sharing knowledge and insights on the usefulness and power behind SketchUp’s brilliant, yet underused, LayOut.

The Elmtec team will be on hand with tips and tricks to up your SketchUp game as we demo and showcase a range of extensions and visualisation software from Enscape to Placemaker.

There’ll be a Q & A Session – An opportunity to quiz the assembled team of SketchUp experts on shortcuts, quick wins, or simply to ask if you can do this (or that) in SketchUp and find out how.

‘Would you like SketchUp with That?’ is on Wednesday 9th October, 4-7pm. The event is FREE however entry is via ticket available from Eventbrite

Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, we’re sure you’ll find this event helpful for any way you use SketchUp. Grab yourself some beer, pizza and get ready for all things SketchUp.


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How VRscans changed PX GROUP’S automobile renders

Post-production and CGI company PX Group is a master of visualising the motor vehicle. It’s created imagery for fellow German companies Audi, Volkswagen, and Mercedes-Benz. You can immediately see why it’s become the visualisation company of choice for such renowned companies: Its imagery quickly conveys the details — the texture of the dash, the grain of the leather seats, the glint of metallic flakes in the car paint. Exterior shots plant the cars in stylised realities; long-exposure cities for sports cars, and dusty trails for SUVs. While the company also does other post-production and CGI work, for artist Oliver Kossatz working on cars is the best part of the job. “I have a huge passion for cars, so of course they’re my favourite thing to render,” says Kossatz. “Of course we have lots of clients in other industries, so I am more of a generalist these days, rendering everything from products to architectural visualisations and animations.” 

In the four years he’s worked for PX Group, Oliver has seen some dramatic changes in the way visualisations are made. While the automobile in the image has usually been a 3D creation, more and more clients ask for fully modelled environments such as cityscapes, modern buildings, or futuristic car parks. “V-Ray® for 3ds Max, with its support for plugins such as Forest Pack, is a huge benefit for these jobs.” While working on such a variety of projects could easily result in cookie-cutter images, PX Group’s imagery always looks unique and tailor-made for the project. The company works with the agency or client, who will either have a good idea of what they want, or who will be open to suggestions from Oliver and his team. From here, Oliver models the scene, either from scratch, or cleaned up from CAD data if it’s provided. Next, he sets the camera and lights the scene, paying attention to anything the client wants to highlight. To ensure maximum realism, PX Group gets help from the experts.

From here, Oliver models the scene, either from scratch, or cleaned up from CAD data if it’s provided. Next, he sets the camera and lights the scene, paying attention to anything the client wants to highlight. To ensure maximum realism, PX Group gets help from the experts. “For vehicle renders, we often get lighting supervision by car photographers,” explains Oliver. “They have years of experience in shooting cars, and their input speeds up the lighting process dramatically. I like working with photographers because these projects are always fun and there is so much to learn from them.”

With the lighting and camera angles set, the images are sent to the clients for review. PX Group’s retouching team may also ask for images to be re-rendered, as this can be easier than fiddling with images in Photoshop. “A good relationship between CGI and post-production is a major part of our workflow,” says Oliver. One challenge to Oliver’s workflow has been the detailed creation of materials for his projects. “In the past, we’ve relied on traditional workflows to capture diffuse, reflection and normal maps from photographs. The amount of time spent for putting this all together was very high, especially if you want to show every little detail.”

Oliver leaped at the chance to try VRscans, Chaos Group’s revolutionary library of high-quality scanned materials. The VRscans process photographs physical material thousands of times from different angles and under many lighting scenarios, resulting in a digital material which looks and acts exactly like the original. “VRscans has revolutionised our workflow,” Oliver says.“The library that comes with VRScans is very extensive and perfect for our kind of jobs. It’s exciting to see new materials being added all the time.” When suitable materials aren’t available in the VRscans library, a custom scanning service is available. Artists and designers can send physical samples, from 20 to 200 mm square, to Chaos Group, who will scan it into a seamless, tileable file. The scanned files are delivered via FTP, and the samples are returned. It’s a service Oliver has made use of.

“They turned out great!” he says. “They were samples we’ve had the most trouble with, like cloth for car interiors with very specific patterns. Using VRscans couldn’t be easier, the process is foolproof as long as the geometry has properly assigned UV coordinates. This avoids common errors.” With VRscans in place, Oliver is free to stop fiddling with materials and able to concentrate on the bigger picture. And while he’s not sure what his next image will be, it’s definitely going to be up his street. “The next project is always ahead,” he says. “It will be an automotive job, that’s for sure.” 

Purchase VRscans from our web store.

All images courtesy of © PX Group. Article originally published by Chaos Group.

Cadsoft Solutions Limited, Chaos Group Official Partner.

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Announcing SketchUp Pro 2019 and LayOut Feature Updates

SketchUp has been improved with updates and enhancements that will impact your 3D projects and professional workflow. If you’re in the market for a new CAD rental solution, then now really is a good time to upgrade/rent the latest version of SketchUp. It’s the small changes that make the biggest workflow improvements. This latest update to SketchUp has made it more intuitive — and more fun to use. With more focus on improvements to imagery exports, usability, and a seamless LayOut connection — your professional workflow will thank you.

Professional output enhancements

Exporting images

Exporting 2D graphics, raster files, and animations just got better. You can now control the overall line thicknesses of exported images with our new line scale multiplier, found in the export options dialogs. 

Before this change, line weights stayed the same as the viewport which would make the line weight too small or too large. So, if you are experiencing line weights that are too thick, you can make those line weights thinner. Also, .png images now export with its transparency so you can see what is behind the material while compositing.

Customisable unit settings

Have you ever needed to use different unit measurements for a model? Now your model can be customised to show different unit measurements for area and volume. For example, in a model of a room, you can use millimetres for the wall and meters for volume. Available unit types: millimetres, centimetres, meters, inches and feet. 

Workflow improvements

Invert Selection

It really is the small things that help your workflow. This new feature will allow you to select anything, then invert the selection of objects. This makes it simple to select items and then perform actions on their inverse. The keyboard shortcut for this will be: CTRL + SHIFT + I (Windows)  or CMD + SHIFT + I (Mac).

Importing files

The days of picking out your import file format from a long list are over. You can now drag and drop ALL supported file types directly into your modelling window. By default, you’ll now see all supported file types available for import. Additionally, the DWG and DXF importers now bring in fewer duplicate and messy edges.

Eraser Tool

Have you ever accidentally erased too much in your model? To make your detailing workflow a little smoother and seamless, we added alt & cmd as modifier keys to remove any unnecessarily highlighted lines that you may have accidentally captured during your modelling efforts.

Section Planes

Cutting a model along a plane so that you can peer inside the model? We just made this way smoother. Section planes now ask the user to name them before placing them in the model. Simply place, then name.

Send to LayOut

You can now send your models directly to LayOut from the large toolset in the left-hand toolbar. If you haven’t used LayOut for 2D drawings before, start taking advantage of it now!

Large Area Imports for Add Location

You can now easily import large sites at full resolution. How can you take advantage of this new feature? Simply zoom out a bit, then select the level from which you want to import. Note that misusing this feature can adversely affect performance in your SketchUp model. Check out our help center to be sure you’re aware of how to best handle lots of data in your models.

New in LayOut

Professional output enhancements

Isometric dimensioning

It is now possible to make linear dimensions align with an isometric viewpoint. This one is huge! Since an isometric drawing is a primary type of drawing in LayOut, we wanted to make it smoother and more straightforward. You can now control extension lines, gap distance, and align dimensions with isometric angles.

Auto-text

Similar to “smart labels”, you can now add text to dimensions without breaking the automatic measurement. For example, let’s say you create a wall dimension. You can dimension a wall, add the word “wall”, and the dimension measurement will still update if the wall’s measurement changes. Pro tip: make sure your string has <> in it. For example, ‘Width <>’ will turn into ‘Wall 1.42m’.

Workflow enhancements

Rotating dimensions

Now, when you rotate your object, the bounding box is also rotated with so you can continue to scale in the right orientation. 

Quicker editing

Staying consistent with SketchUp usability, in LayOut you can now hit the return key to edit model views, groups, dimensions, or labels! Just select, press return, and start typing!

Ready to try? Browse our Trimble SketchUp collection and search for the appropriate license type to see for yourself how these updates can enhance your professional workflows. 


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“Chaos Cloud has saved me incredible amounts of time”

Architect Joël Legault creates his own studio-quality renders with V-Ray for Rhino and Chaos Cloud. Discover how he works, plus his tips for that lived-in look.

Architecture is adapting to new technology more quickly than any other field. VR and 360-degree renders are giving architects and their clients a sense of scale like never before, while advanced computer modelling and 3D printing are making it possible to experiment with new materials and forms. And on the site: AR is making it easy for construction managers to put all the pieces into the right places.

Increasingly powerful software has also led to the emergence of architects who can create their own renders. A perfect example of this is Joël Legault, a Vancouver-based architect who uses natural materials to design beautiful minimalist homes and creates his own photorealistic interior and exterior renders, which are worthy of a dedicated architectural visualisation studio.

Joël’s designs are created in Rhino and rendered with V-Ray for Rhino via Chaos Cloud. Here, he tells us his story, talks us through his work processes and reveals how Cloud rendering has transformed him into a master of multitasking.

Could you give us a little background on yourself and how you got started as an architect? 

I studied and practiced painting for quite a few years before really thinking about architecture. I  completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts, with a focus in painting, here in Canada at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and then moved to London to do an MA in Fine Art at Chelsea College of Arts.

While in London, I lived with fashion and graphic designers and realized I wanted to apply my creative skills to something more pragmatic, similar to what my friends were doing in their design work. Architecture had interested me since I was an adolescent, so it seemed like the next logical step. 

After London, I moved back to Canada and completed my architectural studies at the University of Toronto, which lead to work at The Ateliers Jean Nouvel in Paris and Saucier Perrotte Architectes in Montreal. Once I was licensed, I went out on my own and started my own practice, Joël Legault Architecture.

What types of projects do you work on? 

During the last few years, I’ve focused primarily on residential projects. I enjoy the scale as there are many opportunities to develop fine details both architecturally and through visualization. Projects of this type and size also can be highly detailed through 3D modeling and material textures. This, in turn, translates well when it is time to render and visualize them for clients and promotional work.

© Joël Legault Architecture Inc.

What are the advantages of creating your own renders versus outsourcing them to an arch viz firm? 

In some firms, renders are an afterthought and contracted out, but this is not the case for me. Renderings are a big part of not only communicating notions of materials, lighting and space to the client, but also a means for myself as an architect to fully understand what I’m designing. It is as important a tool as architectural drawings or physical models. I can use it in-house and develop very accurate ideas of what we are proposing.

Where do you look for inspiration? 

I usually model up what I’ve designed, set up the scene with materials and lighting, and then imagine what is going on in the scene. I think about who is living in the space, what books or art they might have, and what type of relationships might exist domestically. I don’t like to put people in the renderings but instead let the scene create a sense of drama or atmosphere for the viewer.

I’m an art and film aficionado and often look to these mediums as a source of inspiration. I’m especially drawn to how some painters and cinematographers treat lighting and compose a scene.

Visualization is the perfect marriage of my art background and practice as an architect today. The principles of composition and treatment of light and color are, at a basic level, the exact same in painting with a brush or rendering with a computer. Visualization is really a means of painting architecture.

© Joël Legault Architecture Inc.

 What made you choose V-Ray for Rhino? 

I have used a lot of different types of 3D modeling software over the years, but I always come back to Rhino 3D. For the type of architectural and visualization work I do, it just seems to be the Swiss Army knife of everything that is out there. It is great for detailed modeling and drawing, and can easily be used as a parametric modeler with the many plug-ins available.

While there are not as many options for rendering plug-ins for Rhino as other programs, there are more than there were in the past. With the advent of V-Ray 3.6, however, there is really nothing else on the market that comes close. The interface is amazing and it is apparent that it was developed with Rhino users in mind. The integration of a lot of features, like Grasshopper and V-Ray Fur, to render grass and whatnot are things that other rendering software developers have never made available in Rhino before.

Too often, a lot of the rendering plug-ins for Rhino seem to be rehashed versions of programs that were originally developed for 3ds Max or Cinema 4D. V-Ray for Rhino is the first rendering program that I have implemented in my work and felt as though it worked seamlessly with both Rhino’s limitations and strengths as a 3D modeling program.

What hardware did you use for rendering before Chaos Cloud? 

I’ve always stuck with my trusted 2012 iMac, but recently I was considering a new system that was going to cost several thousands of dollars. I was really on the fence about it, though, as it was a lot of money. One night, I was with a friend at a bar having a drink and we started talking to a computer scientist next to us. 

I mentioned to him what I was looking at putting together as a computer, and he laughed and said that it was a waste of money as cloud computing was just around the corner. I’m glad that I listened to him and canceled my computer order! I think the V-Ray Cloud beta was in its infancy and when I first heard about it, and I thought about what the guy at the bar had told me. So I’m still using that iMac, but I might treat myself to a MacBook Pro laptop soon.

© Joël Legault Architecture Inc.

How much time do you think Chaos Cloud has saved you? 

It has definitely saved me time, but it has also opened up creative possibilities in how I visualize my projects. My workflow has really changed. Before I might have spent a lot of time setting things up and then letting them tie up my computer for hours, but now I can continue to work on a project and send test images as we continue to develop ideas. It’s almost like having more people and resource power than I could have ever imagined.

Do you find it easy to use Chaos Cloud? 

I found it very intuitive and accessible right out of the gate. It was incredibly easy to sign up for, and the easy integration into V-Ray for Rhino meant that it became the main method I use for rendering. The notifications and easy ability to send and see images as they are being rendered from even your smartphone is amazing.

Are there any V-Ray tips or tricks you would like to share?

I always think it’s good practice to go into a new rendering with some idea of what I would like to do with the lighting. Where does the light source come from? How will I generate the shadows? Will I use an HDRI or a V-Ray Sun? Then I always do some quick renderings with low production settings using the V-Ray Material Override function. I set all the geometry to white except for the transparent materials. This allows for a faster process of trial and error with regard to testing different variables of how the lighting is set up in the scene. You are able to test ideas much faster this way.

Next, I turn everything back on and set up some different settings while sending the rendering to Chaos Cloud. These obviously take a little longer but I find that by sending multiple renderings at once and testing different settings, I’m able to see multiple variations of the same image almost simultaneously. I won’t fully render them, but I’ll do enough so that I can get an idea of the results.  

This type of workflow was impossible for me before Chaos Cloud. It was: try something, send the rendering, check what is wrong, modify it and repeat. Chaos Cloud has saved me incredible amounts of time as I can work exponentially faster.

The living world: Joël’s approach to level-of-detail 

A lot of times I find that architectural renderings can feel a bit cold or too slick. The way architecture is photographed sometimes can be this way as well. It can be a bit of a stretch for the viewer to get a sense of how the spaces might be used. I like to think of the buildings I have designed as a kind of stage and use the visualizations as a means of populating that stage with different scenarios.

By creating that “lived-in” feeling and purposely not including people in the renderings themselves, my goal is that the viewer can easily project themselves into the scenes I have created. My renderings display something that has transpired or is in the midst of transpiring. The level of detail with what might go into the space or how it might be used gives as much of a sense of how the building would be experienced as the materials and architecture itself. For me, the images are like little scenes in a movie or play.

From a technical standpoint, I usually start with modeling the building itself and try to add as much detail as possible. I’ll include things like outlets or air vents so that you get more of a sense that it is an actual building or space as opposed to just an idealized version of what is being proposed. 

After that, I add things like furniture and everyday elements such as books and art. I am very particular which books, art, or perhaps what is playing on the television if there is one in the scene. This can sometimes take a long time to find, and to place the right textures, but overall I think that in concert they add to the overall objective I’m after with my visualization work. 

Filling the scene with a lot of objects does require a large library of models. Fortunately, I have built mine up over the years. Sometimes if I don’t have something I will quickly model it myself and apply materials. I’ll isolate whatever I am working on in Rhino, render it with V-Ray interactive rendering, and that way I can be working on the object at hand and see how it will render at the same time.

What sort of post-production techniques do you use? 

My approach has changed quite a bit over time. Originally, when time and hardware restraints made it difficult to quickly produce high-quality renderings there was a lot of Photoshop work and whatnot. Today, I like to fine-tune and perfect things as much as I can with V-Ray. Chaos Cloud and V-Ray interactive rendering have really helped with this. It’s much easier now to quickly test lighting setups and material tweaks in real time.

© Joël Legault Architecture Inc.

What are you working on next? 

I’m currently working on a summer home located on one of the islands off the coast of British Columbia. We’re still in the initial design stages with the client but I am looking forward to doing some fairly detailed visualization work for the project. It is a beautiful site overlooking the ocean and it lends itself to some pretty phenomenal views. 

I’m also doing visualisation work for clients. I’m going to be doing some exterior renderings for a friend and his small office. It’s a house that won’t be completed for a while, but they were happy with the design and would like some fairly photo-realistic visualisations to promote it. The design is complex and the materials and form will really allow for some interesting exterior images to be produced. I’m looking forward to tackling the project!