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Showcase interior design projects with SketchUp

SketchUp Pro Subscription

In part 1 of this series, we revealed how to create winning interior design options in SketchUp. Now that you’re finished modelling, what’s next? 
We show you how to present your vision to customers and blow them away with your designs. And don’t forget to sign up to watch a live demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar.

A SketchUp Pro subscription includes a powerful ecosystem of products to help you communicate your creations. Let’s explore!

Add custom Styles to your design

Adding your personal style is an important part of showcasing designs. StyleBuilder allows you to create customised line styles using imported digital or hand drawn strokes. Think crisp pen lines, wavy pencil marks or marks from a fat stick of graphite. Combine line styles with unique textures, colours and watermarks to inject your creative flair into models, renders and animations. 

In SketchUp, you can create and edit styles. Apply your preferred style settings with a single click.

Create stunning 2D drawings and branded presentation documents

Now that you’ve added a style, it’s time to insert the model into LayOut. When you import a 3D model, a viewport is placed on the page. Good news, the scenes you set up in your SketchUp file are ready to use in LayOut. 

Combine model views with text and 2D vector illustration to present design details, materials and design options. Many of the tools in LayOut work as they do in SketchUp. That means you can quickly get to drawing, resizing, adding details, making copies and changing styles and scale. 

Present your project in LayOut

Present your ideas with SketchUp Viewer 

Are printed drawings or a pdf the only way to showcase your work? Of course not! SketchUp Viewer for Mobile gives you the power to view and share your portfolio on iOS and Android devices. Take advantage of Augmented Reality to evaluate design options in real-world scale. Switch between scenes to showcase designs on the go while retaining your model’s style.

Model on the go with SketchUp for Web

Not all CAD tools are fully editable on the web, SketchUp is! Handy if you need to make on-the-fly changes when you’re away from your desktop computer. Let’s say you’re in a meeting at a client’s office and they want to see a project with a revised furniture layout. Open a model to SketchUp for Web directly from Trimble Connect on any web device to make the changes in real-time. Save the file to Trimble Connect for easy access back at the office. 

Create rendered images with Trimble Connect visualiser

We’ll wrap this up with something that we are very excited about. Rendering! With a SketchUp Pro Subscription, you can create simplified renders using Trimble Connect for Desktop and the brand new Trimble Connect Visualiser. Note: this feature is currently available for Windows only. 

Step into AR/VR to experience designs before they’re built

Do you have access to a VR or Mixed Reality device? If your answer is yes, you can bring 3D models to life in mixed or virtual reality. Step into a powerful new way to explore, understand, and share your work. The best part? It’s part of a SketchUp Pro Subscription.

Are you using a SketchUp Pro Perpetual license that has expired or is soon to expire? Want to get on to subscription and take advantage of all the new additional features the new plan offers? Email us info@cadsoftsolutions.co.uk and we can advise you.

Remember to sign up to watch a step-by-step demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar on December 11th, 4pm UTC.

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How to win interior design projects with SketchUp

SketchUp Pro Subscription Workflow

Pitching for a new project is one of the most exciting parts of the design process. Creativity needs to flow but deadlines are around the corner. You want to get ideas out of your head quickly and turn them into winning results that will wow your client, boss or team. 

Leverage the full power of a SketchUp Pro subscription at every stage of your creative process to deliver impactful concepts, quickly. Watch us do it live by signing up for our upcoming webinar (and keep reading for a sneak peak!) 

In Part 1 of this series, we’ll teach you how to start from scratch and create design options with ease. In Part 2, you’ll learn how to showcase those designs in their best light, leaving your audience mesmerised. The examples used are interior design focused but don’t worry, these concepts can be applied to almost any industry!

Get started with a 2D sketch, floorplan or photo in SketchUp Pro

There are a few different ways to bring your project into SketchUp right from the start. Don’t be afraid to use what you have depending on the project, whether a sketch, photograph (check out how to use Match Photo) or a 2D plan:

  1. Working from a hand-drawn sketch? Import the hand drawing as an image and start tracing with the Line tool to create a floorplan. This is an easy (and thus popular) way to bring a floorplan into SketchUp.
  1. Have a set of plans? Import a floor plan in CAD, image or PDF. Draw the outline of your project by scaling and drawing from the plan as a reference.

Bring the outline into 3D 

Once you have an outline, you’re ready to draw exterior walls. This workflow highlights how to use imported CAD geometry as your starting point

Create multiple design options using 3D Warehouse

It’s time to bring your space to life. Apply colors and textures with materials to add detail and realism to your models. Visualize your design ideas fast by importing real products from 3D Warehouse

SketchUp lets you quickly work through configurations and build upon the ones you like. Show off options for furnishings or add in various types of greenery to brighten the space and give your design some personality.

The key to showcasing and organising design options for your projects in SketchUp is use of Layers and Scenes. Layers help you organise your model, and Scenes help you present designs easily by adjusting layers, objects, styles and more! 

Save your project to Trimble Connect 

Now that you have your design options in hand, it’s time to save your project to the cloud. Trimble Connect offers you unlimited cloud storage with full version control. The best part? It’s included in a SketchUp Pro subscription

Trimble Connect

Part of a design team? 

Working together just got a little easier with Trimble Connect. Let’s say you’re working on the interior design at the same time another team member is working on the MEP design. 

You can import a reference model into SketchUp from Trimble Connect. You won’t be able to modify the model, but you can use it as context to more easily coordinate the project. This is useful when you have a team of designers working on different areas. 

Invite other people to your project, create groups with different permissions to control which files members can access. You can also utilize version control to track project history and progress.

Flying solo? 

Each time you upload a copy of your design file, Trimble Connect will keep track of the versions. Use version control to manage different iterations of your model and share those as design options with your client. Assign to-dos and quickly work through client feedback, all within Trimble Connect.

Sign up to watch a step-by-step demo of this workflow in our upcoming webinar on December 11th, 4pm UTC.

Stay tuned for part 2 of this article to learn best practices for showcasing your design.

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V-Ray Next for SketchUp, update 1

Vray Next Cadsoft Solutions

Enhanced SketchUp integration. Faster interactive rendering. New, smart functionality.

V-Ray Next for SketchUp, update 1 features an improved user experience for some of your favourite V-Ray tools, faster interactive rendering and powerful new functionality to make it much easier to manage your scenes.

Deep SketchUp integration: Enjoy a natural, streamlined design workflow that leaves more room for creativity.

© Jose Carlos Vela Cáceres.

SKETCHUP COLOURISATION SUPPORT: V-Ray now fully supports native material colourisation.
Make colour corrections on standard SketchUp materials and see the effect right away in the V-Ray Frame Buffer.

IMPROVED USER EXPERIENCE: It’s easier and smoother to use your favourite V-Ray tools, including light creation, Infinite Plane and Scene Interaction. The tool cursor looks the same as SketchUp’s, and the SketchUp Instructor features detailed descriptions and animated presentations on how to use V-Ray tools.

Optimised performance: Faster renders across the board.

OPTIMISED INTERACTIVE RENDERING ON THE CPU: More responsive CPU interactive rendering when editing scene camera, lighting and materials.

NEW LIGHT CACHE ALGORITHM: The new default hash map Light Cache calculation mode resolves most common artifacts and is optimised and more stable when used in animations.

Streamlined workflows: Maximum creative control, minimum effort.

© SketchUp_DL_Projeto_de_Interiores-Quarto

CRYPTOMATTE ELEMENT: The Cryptomatte render element automatically generates and stores object- or material-based masks. It’s perfect when you need to accurately select objects in post-production.

QUICK DENOISER ENGINE SWITCH: A denoiser engine switch is now available in the main renderer rollout. Switch from V-Ray to NVIDIA AI denoising without the Denoiser advanced parameters panel.

UPDATED VFB LENS EFFECTS: Simulate real-world camera lens effects with new procedurally generated dust and scratches.

COLOUR PICKER TEMPERATURE: The V-Ray colour picker introduces a Kelvin temperature slider, which automatically provides a corresponding RGB colour allowing you to save and modify a temperature value for every colour slot.

V-Ray Next for SketchUp is available here.

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SketchUp Desktop 2019.3 Maintenance Release

SketchUp Pro Desktop 2019.3 maintenance update has been released. The SketchUp 2019.3 release focuses on bug fixes for the new macOS Catalina as well as an update to the sign in workflow due to upcoming changes with Google sign in.

Sign In Workflow Changes

What has changed?

Users will now sign into our desktop applications via an external web browser, instead of an embedded web browser. This change impacts both subscription and classic license users.

The change in 2019.3 that will impact classic license users: Users need to be signed in before accessing the 3D Warehouse, Extension Warehouse and Add Location, which they didn’t need to do in previous builds. Accessing these features will go through the new sign-in workflow, which means classic license users need Trimble IDs (or Google IDs) to access them.

Why? This past April, Google announced that it will no longer support Google Sign In through embedded browser frameworks. In order to continue supporting Google Sign In, we’re following one of Google’s recommended solutions: to have users sign in through their default web browsers and capture the sign in information via a web server on their local machine (127.0.0.1).

What does this mean from a user’s point of view?

  • All users need to be signed in to access the 3D Warehouse, Extension Warehouse, Trimble Connect and Add Location from within the desktop apps.
  • When a user selects a ‘Sign In’ command from within a desktop app, the user’s default web browser will open a new tab in order for them to sign in.

SketchUp Release Notes

Fixes

macOS Catalina Support

Added support for macOS Catalina, which included the following updates:

  • Implemented the notarization process that will be required for macOS Catalina.
  • Fixed an issue where the Welcome Window’s templates panel sometimes loaded slowly.
  • Fixed an issue where text was displayed with a black background on some configurations.

Other

  • Changed our internet connection tests to work more robustly across the globe.
  • (Win) Updated libcrypto and libssl dlls to 1.1.1c.

Please note: If you’re using either Microsoft Internet Explorer or Microsoft Edge as your default browser then you may run into some issues with this new workflow. You can read about this issue along with some workarounds in our article titled Support for Microsoft Internet Explorer or Edge Browser in SketchUp 2019.3 , please visit this article for more information.

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Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin

Cadsoft.Solutions.Modelur

Speaking earlier this year at our Kettle’s Yard event in Cambridge, Stephanie Veanca HoUniversity of Cambridge Department of Architecture delivered a fascinating presentation centred around the use of parametric urban design software tool, Modelur, developed to help you quickly create conceptual urban massing. Here, Stephanie has provided further insight into the department’s research and work with Sketchup and Modelur on the North East Cambridge Development.

Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin The research is undertaken by the Cities and Transport Group, Department of Architecture, University of Cambridge, supervised by Dr Ying Jin. The Sketchup + Modelur model is made by Stephanie Veanca Ho and the UNITY environment and interface by Amir Soltani. In this project we define ‘built form’ as the assemblage of individual buildings and structures in the built environment and we make use of a wide range of new insights and data to model the evolution of the built form in Britain.  The project aims to produce graphic representation and visualisation using Sketchup 3D modelling and gaming software UNITY so that the complex built form options can be readily understood and explored by non-specialists.  This empowers citizens in their thinking of the future of the UK as well as the local communities, thus closing the feedback loop in analysis, modelling and decision-making for complex investment and development initiatives. 

This blog article focuses on the Sketchup and UNITY visualization example we have developed for North East Cambridge, an area by the Cambridge North Station. Our researchers explore ways to experiment the interrelationships between predictive Data (numbers), Site Strategy (urban scale) and Building Design (unit scale) that govern the outlook of neighbourhood developments. Sketchup plugin Modelur by AgiliCity is used to assist parametric modelling of city blocks and buildings for handling various data variables. For the use of this model’s predictive analyses, see the CPIER report  (https://www.cpier.org.uk/final-report/) and the first round of UK2070 Commission Reports (http://uk2070.org.uk/publications/).

Cambridge North East Development
The proposed development is located at the existing sewage plant north of the Cambridge North Station, bounded by the railway, Cowley Road and A14. It is also adjacent to the Cambridge Science Park and the St John’s Innovation Park. 
We need to figure out a way to get the total GFA per storey data and total unit number efficiently from the vast volumes of buildings created in Sketchup. We came across the plugin Modelur and Jernej Vidmar, Modelur’s creator, who has been very helpful assisting our research and experimental modelling since April.  

Building Type

4 types of building forms and 2 major land uses (housing and employment) are first identified. The respective and total GFA for each type of housing units and employment will have to match the different scenarios acquired earlier from data models. 

Sketchup &  Modelur

Parametric Sketchup Urban Design with Modelur Plugin

Modelur offers us a real-time data break-down report on screen while we change the size, height, combination of mixed land-uses and other town planning variables.  We can hence easily make changes to the urban design strategy and building types while maintaining data accuracy. Modelur also gives warnings to buildings that do not fall into the city block parameters or zoning prerequisites, such as maximum building height, FAR, minimum distances between buildings, etc.

From Sketchup to UNITY

In this project we define ‘built form’ as the assemblage of individual buildings and structures in the built environment and we make use of a wide range of new insights and data to model the evolution of the built form in Britain. The Sketchup model here focuses on the Cambridge North East site (the existing sewage plant near the Cambridge North Railway Station).

Further Research

Sketchup, Modelur and UNITY

Modelur is also capable of generating data reports and in the most recent version, of importing much more complex and layered GIS datasets. Modelur has proven very useful accompanying the 3D capacity of Sketchup for handling large-scale urban forms. The plugin has enhanced the output accuracy of the digitally-built environment which can then be taken on for further research.

SketchUp is available on our web store as a perpetual and annual subscription.

Modelur is available with personal and team annual subscription options.

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“Would You Like SketchUp With That?” returns Oct 9th!

Whether you’re interested in learning about new features and enhancements, tips and tricks from assembled experts and specialists or keen to see some of SketchUp’s most powerful and dynamic plug-ins in action, you need to come along to our next FREE SketchUp beer & pizza event! Last time out we were in Cambridge at the prestigious Kettle’s Yard. This time we’re at Anomalous Space, Pentonville Road, London.

Uniquely located between London’s Angel Islington, Kings Cross, Clerkenwell & Old Street, Anomalous Space is a multi-use environment situated within a converted Georgian town house. Boasting original Art Deco features and contemporary technology Anomalous Space seamlessly blends the comfort of the old with the innovation of the new. Angel tube station is only a 2 minute walk from the venue.

Paul Hensey, Principal of Green Zone Design Limited, will be sharing knowledge and insights on the usefulness and power behind SketchUp’s brilliant, yet underused, LayOut.

The Elmtec team will be on hand with tips and tricks to up your SketchUp game as we demo and showcase a range of extensions and visualisation software from Enscape to Placemaker.

There’ll be a Q & A Session – An opportunity to quiz the assembled team of SketchUp experts on shortcuts, quick wins, or simply to ask if you can do this (or that) in SketchUp and find out how.

‘Would you like SketchUp with That?’ is on Wednesday 9th October, 4-7pm. The event is FREE however entry is via ticket available from Eventbrite

Whether you’re a beginner or a pro, we’re sure you’ll find this event helpful for any way you use SketchUp. Grab yourself some beer, pizza and get ready for all things SketchUp.


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Announcing SketchUp Pro 2019 and LayOut Feature Updates

SketchUp has been improved with updates and enhancements that will impact your 3D projects and professional workflow. If you’re in the market for a new CAD rental solution, then now really is a good time to upgrade/rent the latest version of SketchUp. It’s the small changes that make the biggest workflow improvements. This latest update to SketchUp has made it more intuitive — and more fun to use. With more focus on improvements to imagery exports, usability, and a seamless LayOut connection — your professional workflow will thank you.

Professional output enhancements

Exporting images

Exporting 2D graphics, raster files, and animations just got better. You can now control the overall line thicknesses of exported images with our new line scale multiplier, found in the export options dialogs. 

Before this change, line weights stayed the same as the viewport which would make the line weight too small or too large. So, if you are experiencing line weights that are too thick, you can make those line weights thinner. Also, .png images now export with its transparency so you can see what is behind the material while compositing.

Customisable unit settings

Have you ever needed to use different unit measurements for a model? Now your model can be customised to show different unit measurements for area and volume. For example, in a model of a room, you can use millimetres for the wall and meters for volume. Available unit types: millimetres, centimetres, meters, inches and feet. 

Workflow improvements

Invert Selection

It really is the small things that help your workflow. This new feature will allow you to select anything, then invert the selection of objects. This makes it simple to select items and then perform actions on their inverse. The keyboard shortcut for this will be: CTRL + SHIFT + I (Windows)  or CMD + SHIFT + I (Mac).

Importing files

The days of picking out your import file format from a long list are over. You can now drag and drop ALL supported file types directly into your modelling window. By default, you’ll now see all supported file types available for import. Additionally, the DWG and DXF importers now bring in fewer duplicate and messy edges.

Eraser Tool

Have you ever accidentally erased too much in your model? To make your detailing workflow a little smoother and seamless, we added alt & cmd as modifier keys to remove any unnecessarily highlighted lines that you may have accidentally captured during your modelling efforts.

Section Planes

Cutting a model along a plane so that you can peer inside the model? We just made this way smoother. Section planes now ask the user to name them before placing them in the model. Simply place, then name.

Send to LayOut

You can now send your models directly to LayOut from the large toolset in the left-hand toolbar. If you haven’t used LayOut for 2D drawings before, start taking advantage of it now!

Large Area Imports for Add Location

You can now easily import large sites at full resolution. How can you take advantage of this new feature? Simply zoom out a bit, then select the level from which you want to import. Note that misusing this feature can adversely affect performance in your SketchUp model. Check out our help center to be sure you’re aware of how to best handle lots of data in your models.

New in LayOut

Professional output enhancements

Isometric dimensioning

It is now possible to make linear dimensions align with an isometric viewpoint. This one is huge! Since an isometric drawing is a primary type of drawing in LayOut, we wanted to make it smoother and more straightforward. You can now control extension lines, gap distance, and align dimensions with isometric angles.

Auto-text

Similar to “smart labels”, you can now add text to dimensions without breaking the automatic measurement. For example, let’s say you create a wall dimension. You can dimension a wall, add the word “wall”, and the dimension measurement will still update if the wall’s measurement changes. Pro tip: make sure your string has <> in it. For example, ‘Width <>’ will turn into ‘Wall 1.42m’.

Workflow enhancements

Rotating dimensions

Now, when you rotate your object, the bounding box is also rotated with so you can continue to scale in the right orientation. 

Quicker editing

Staying consistent with SketchUp usability, in LayOut you can now hit the return key to edit model views, groups, dimensions, or labels! Just select, press return, and start typing!

Ready to try? Browse our Trimble SketchUp collection and search for the appropriate license type to see for yourself how these updates can enhance your professional workflows. 


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“I bumped into SketchUp at version 5!”

Paul Hensey is a specialist in design, horticulture and construction techniques. He is the Principal at Green Zone Garden and Landscape Design, Midhurst, West Sussex. Paul is a Fellow of the Society of Garden Designers and former Vice Chair, Member Chartered Institute Horticulture, Member Garden Media Guild & a Technical Journalist and Author specialising in Construction techniques, materials and Computer Aided Design. A landscape & garden designer since 1999, with numerous awards, inc Gold & Best in show and Most Innovative Garden at RHS Tatton, Hampton Court and Chelsea and an SGD Award winner 2019. A frequent lecturer on construction detailing and an educator and trainer in SketchUp, he enjoys sharing his extensive knowledge of the world’s favourite 3D modeller and we’re delighted that he’s guest written an article for our Blog. You’ll also be able to come and see Paul in person at our upcoming SketchUp event at Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge where he’ll be sharing valuable insights into his use of SketchUp, particularly LayOut.

His new book “Construction Detailing for Landscape and Garden Design Volume 2 – Water Features” is out now.

I bumped into SketchUp at version 5, shortly before Google acquired it. I was returning from living in Scandinavia and needed a cheap and simple software solution to support my new business as a landscape and garden designer. I had been used to high end 3D CAD systems, working as an industrial designer and I was struggling to make anything fit the way I worked, whilst being on a scale that I could manage as a one-man operation.

SketchUp was somewhat simplistic at that time, but then so were my designs, it was a good fit. I have been a loyal user, perhaps even an evangelist ever since.

I am now based in West Sussex, designing landscapes and garden schemes throughout the South of England. I work on intimate back yards, roof terraces through to large country estates. Because of my engineering background I have a passion for solving three dimensional problems and construction detailing is where I am happiest. Whilst I can visualise how everything fits, I need to communicate it to those who will actually do the work, so everything gets modelled. If two or more things come together then the has to be a drawing and for there to be a drawing there has to be a model. I do it well enough that I am employed by many other designers to do the detailing and problem solving on their projects and it now forms a significant portion of my business. Encountering so many aspects of construction inspired me to record the solutions to typical situations and I have two books published on construction, all of the illustrations were of course created in SketchUp.

I work almost exclusively in SketchUp and where I do step outside the software to develop images or presentations in particular; I am working on geometry that has been exported from SketchUp.

I have a pretty robust workflow. At the start of a project, data can arrive in several ways: whether as a .dwg plan of the site from an architect or surveyor, through to a doodle on a scrap of paper indicating a designer’s vision; many designers use CAD to capture their idea but have no wish or interest in driving the software to work out the details and anticipate problems. Its important to get an accurate representation of the existing site or space and so I always create a reference model of the space or terrain.

Early stage design work can be on paper or directly in SketchUp. I use whichever tool best facilitates quick exploration of ideas. Communication with clients and contractors is always through SketchUp models, even if they sometimes take a trip through Photoshop or one of the filter software plugins.  In the early stages these are always mass models, developing the space and helping visualise scale, proportion and positioning. Good quality textures help enormously. The design process is iterative, and I have found that going in too early with realistic images can close down design options and manoeuvrability as compromises and changes have to be considered and introduced as reality and budgets kick in. Once a design is approved the fun really begins. Whilst I thoroughly enjoy the creativity and development of concepts, I love the problem solving and detailing that comes with resolving the constructability of a design.

This requires new models. Each element, junction and assembled item is modelled from its constituent parts These are saved as separate models both within the project but also within a separate parts library. They now become an asset for future projects. Whilst the 3D models are created in SketchUp, Layout is the window through which I present images and drawings to clients and contractors. So long as a model has a logical layer structure then Layout will readily allow the composition of 2D and 3D diagrams. I add all dimensions and drawing labels here as well as importing reference images. So long as the project file structure is set up correctly, any changes made to the model are reflected across all associated drawings. This saves a lot of time and head scratching. I keep the Layout files updated and referenced to the parent SketchUp model and save out each up-issue as a PDF, giving me a record of the issue history.

Planting plan created in Layout

I learnt pretty early on that you need to name and store files in a consistent and methodical manor: A naming convention like: “Mr & Mrs Smith final site plan” is going to lead to problems when the approved plan ceases to have the finality you had hoped.

Layout isn’t just a subservient tool to SketchUp. I create a lot of original content within it (it’s a vector based drawing tool after all) from electrical and irrigation symbols, plant and tree icons to entire drawings of common details. The library within Layout (called Scrapbooks) is customisable and I add an ever-expanding collection of drawings that are immediately accessible and can be dragged onto project specific sheets. Layout is a seriously underused aspect of SketchUp. You can read about it, but nothing beats being shown. Professional looking drawings take practice but if your SketchUp model is good then you are almost there.

Top tips for Layout:

Save your layout file as soon as you create it, in the folder location you want. This will save references becoming “detached” later on.

Set up a range of templates (i.e. drawing sheets) to your design and with your logo etc. A3, A2, A1 etc

Create a custom Scrapbook of the symbols and graphics that you use all the time: plants, trees, scale bars, north etc. It will make creating drawings so much quicker and you will have a consistent style.  You can import “Cad-blocks” for a lot of line work (e.g. vehicles)

Before I start any detailed design, I story board what I want on each output sheet and how many sheets I want. This keeps me focussed and helps a lot when quoting for work.

Set up your Scenes in SketchUp to give you the best view/ representation. You can add graphics such as cross section hatching as an overlay in Layout if required.

Be consistent in your Layout style. Look at other people’s drawings. For example, I mostly use iso views for “engineering” drawings as perspective can be visually jarring sometimes.

When you have “sent to Layout”, set up your view with your preferred scene and scale. Copy and pasting the viewport means that you can add multiple views per page, even across pages and change to different scenes without having to go back and send each scene to Layout. This was a revelation to me when I first found it!

Come and see Paul and other esteemed SketchUp experts at Kettle’s Yard on Thursday 20th June. Space is limited and tickets are going fast, so don’t wait too long to get yours. Get your FREE ticket(s) here

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Would You Like SketchUp With That?

Cadsoft Solutions Limited in association with SketchUp UK invite you to join us for our first SketchUp showcase event here in Cambridge. If you’re a commercial, education or student user of SketchUp, this event is for you. Join us at the prestigious Kettle’s Yard for all things SketchUp. Beer and pizza is on us!

We’ll be meeting and greeting in the Clore Learning Space at Kettle’s Yard and have a schedule packed with all things SketchUp, including showcase demonstrations from guest speakers and an extensive opportunity for Q&A. If you have an issue or technical query relating to SketchUp, why not come along and seek the advice of one of the SketchUp experts in the room? This is a FREE event.

Who is this event for?

Does SketchUp feature in your day-to-day work? Are you an architect, work in commercial interiors, construction, landscape architecture, 3D printing, residential construction, urban planning, furniture making and design, woodworking, art, product design, set design, an art gallery or museum? Are you studying and using SketchUp? If the answer to any of the aforementioned is ‘yes’, then this event is for you.

What to expect

Hear from guest speakers, meet other SketchUp users, speak with SketchUp experts, talk projects, collaborate, learn some new tricks, find out about new extensions and much more. We’re providing beer, soft drinks, pizza and some freebies for guests.

Event schedule (subject to last minute changes. Timings for guidance)

  • Welcome and Introductions (4.10pm);
  • What’s new in the world of SketchUp;
  • Showcase, Stephanie Veanca Ho, University of Cambridge Department of Architecture, Paul Hensey of Green Zone Design Limited, Nick Johnson, Cadsoft Solutions Limited ; There will be demonstrations of SketchUp extension Modelur, Enscape, Kubity, LayOut & more; (4.30pm)
  • Beer and Pizza time! (5.45pm);
  • Q&A : Ask the experts (6.30);
  • Over to you for networking (and more beer & pizza) (from 7.15pm);
  • Event closes (9pm).

Space is limited and tickets are going fast, so don’t wait too long to get yours. Get your FREE ticket(s) here